Tag: writing

Why Spokane?

Why Spokane?

What made me choose Spokane, Washington as the setting of my historical mystery Butcher, Baker, Candlestick Taker? Three things: people, locations, and events. Over the next several months leading up to my Big Book Announcement, I’m excited to tell you more about why Spokane, Washington, of all places, really needed a book set in its …

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Why Historical Fiction?

Why Historical Fiction?

One of my favorite authors is Alison Weir, and the reason I love her work so much is because she began as a biographical nonfiction writer. When she started writing historical fiction, her research paid off ten-fold by adding an element of realism that you just don’t get with other authors who don’t thoroughly research. …

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How Much History is Too Much History?

How Much History is Too Much History?

What does a writer of historical fiction have in common with a writer of epic fantasy? How much history is too much history? It’s the same dilemma for both writers, oddly enough. For the epic fantasy writer (like my husband, Andrew Meredith), there’s always the question of spending too much time describing the world, and …

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The Query Question

The Query Question

I recently had a friend ask me how I got my agent with the idea being that she also would like to pursue publication. But when I started explaining, her eyes glazed over and she got that funny twitch in the corner of her mouth that people get when they’re like, “Are you kidding me??” …

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Reviving My Blue Flame

Reviving My Blue Flame

I mentioned in my last post that I’ve been having trouble finding the energy to write, and it finally occurred to me that maybe what was holding me back (outside of quarantine stress) was this feeling like I couldn’t just write whatever gave me joy, which right now might not be mystery. It was then …

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Writing During Quarantine

Writing During Quarantine

As an introvert, I recharge with time alone. So I have to admit, when Quarantine hit, hearing that all required social events were canceled made my little introvert heart soar with happiness. Fast forward six or seven (or has it been eight?) weeks… I’ve been spiraling through cycles of depression and mood swings like crazy …

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What is Success? A Little Women Comparison

What is Success? A Little Women Comparison

How do you define success? It’s a loaded question, isn’t it? In the newest adaptation of L.M. Alcott’s Little Women, director Greta Gerwig helps viewers and readers take a fresh look at a favorite classic. One of the biggest questions I felt she asked through the retelling is, “What is success?” For Meg, success is …

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Happy Endings in Mysteries

Happy Endings in Mysteries

I recently rewatched Stranger Than Fiction, which I remembered being more of a depressing drama than a comedy (which in many ways was an accurate remembrance), and was nervous right up to the end because I couldn’t recall if it had a happy ending. It made me consider why I prefer what is generally referred …

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Being an Introverted Mom and Writer

Being an Introverted Mom and Writer

I’ll be honest, I don’t read a lot of non-fiction that isn’t about history or has something to do with research for my historical fiction books. I just don’t have the time. But then one of the authors of a mommy blog I follow, Jamie C. Martin, published a book called Introverted Mom. I snapped …

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Happy Birthday, Anna Katharine Green!

Happy Birthday, Anna Katharine Green!

This week I wanted to give a special homage to the woman who’s become a huge part of my life lately: the remarkable Anna Katharine Green. On this day, November 11, in 1846, Anna Katharine Green was born to New England lawyer James Wilson Green and Katharine Ann Whitney Green. She was the fourth child, …

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